Four nights with the strippers of Reno.

Jesse Luthi. Instagram: medicinecabinetdreams

Exhaustion is a key word here. Something you probably didn’t know: your average stripper works (as a stripper) about seven times a month. If you find that confusing, monetarily, why not work more to make more money? Exhaustion has everything to do with it. Exhaustion is more than being tired, there’s an amygdalatic component, emotional.

Four nights is a lot of nights in a row to go to strip clubs. I’ll apologize in advance, it all gets a little bit jumbled. But I think I wanted to feel it. The monotony, the paradigms and similarities. The actual work of sex…


(or the first 2/3rds anyway)

By the time I was 20 I had already seen enough movies that if somebody asked me to recite a top ten list of favorites I thought the exercise goofy. Which is to say that I know proclaiming something as the best of anything is inherently ridiculous, but this is what I like about it. If this article was simply to expose you to a movie you’ve probably never seen (which, to be fair, it mostly is) there wouldn’t be enough real work for me to do. Look, there’s the movie’s jacket cover. It’s starring husband and wife team John…


Rene Descartes, showing off his best Mona Lisa smile

The answer to this question (What’s the point of knowledge?) often comes back as if it was self-evident. The point of knowledge is awareness. The point of knowledge is a removal of ignorance. And certainly these are valuable tools. Though it seems obvious to me that human beings as biological creatures have limitations that prohibit constant awareness. A good example of this is Aldous Huxley’s book The Doors of Perception — where Huxley experiences psychotropic substances and details the way certain processes of human cognition were built specifically for our evolution as animals. The sober creature is always filtering information…


Three Bees who buzz around my brain. Beckett, Barthelme, Bukowski

I like to think that literary fiction and physics share at least one common characteristic. That what Richard Feynman said about quantum mechanics; “If you think you understand quantum mechanics, you don’t.” That this also applies to literary fiction. Which, at its best, is the study of life and human dynamics and the eternal necessity of narrative in the structure of our consciousness. Or, how narrative turns to describe inter-spatial randomness by giving events meaning. Giving the characters in books specific functions, as greek letters, in the complex equations that are our lives. …


A still from a sketch on World Peace

“The crucial distinction between systems is no longer ideological. The main political differences are between those who do — and those who do not think the citizen is the property of the state.”

  • Christopher Hitchens Letters to a Young Contrarian

I often don’t have trouble with opening sentences, but something here is eluding me. For one, I probably should’ve picked a different title, though I’m going to leave it as is. I should’ve because there’s really no part of me that believes defining World Peace — a sketch comedy show by three white men which aired early in the morning…


I don’t drive that much, so what I listen to when I do is pretty simple. Three FM stations. Two are classic rock, the third is NPR. A station which about half the time I flip to its frequency, I have to very quickly flip away. Yet out of all the boring blather I’ve balked at, I don’t think I’ve ever heard anything quite as obnoxious as a Robin DiAngelo lecture on racism.

First of all, this lecturer who gets paid 10,000 dollars a pop to do corporate seminars, didn’t sound very smart. From what I could stand to listen…


A Modern Evaluation of Robert Pirsig’s LILA

I often encourage people to start reading books in their middles. I do not read for plot and I have belief that every page of a good book should have its own kind of power. Such is the case with Robert Pirsig’s novel Lila. Like Pirsig’s surprise bestseller of 1974, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (Zen for short), Lila follows a similar structure. Man on a journey ponders the universe. With Zen it’s a motorcycle trip across the Midwest. In Lila it’s a sailing trip down the eastern shore. In both books this loose knit structure offers a…


From my friend Tom Strah’s home studio. Another famous suicide.

There’s a lot of reasons to kill yourself. Not least of which is that if one perceived life as a series of projects, tasks to be completed, the penultimate project would be coming to terms with one’s death. Not simply mortality, but the precise moment of the end. I know I can’t help but think about it often.

Though final projects have a simple seduction, the question remains to ask oneself — how did I come to the notion that life was a series of projects in the first place? As a young man I absorbed a certain amount of…


Florence Nightingale. “How little can be done under the spirit of fear.”

My friend owns a used bookstore, it’s a nice place to stop in. There’s a rotating cast of characters who pass thru. Among them a male nurse/poet who I’ve never seen in scrubs. His hair is curly, short, and always tidy with product. He always wears dress shoes. He is handsome but god knows if he’s ever used it. He might be a homosexual (an acquaintance, while we were both young, once chastised me for contemplating the sexual orientation of a young woman. Asking me, rhetorically: just what did it matter? As if one’s interest in such a thing could…


To self-publish or not to self-publish? What’s the question?

Number 1: Do Not Assume that Anyone is going to Give A Shit.

I mean this in all possible interpretations. This is why it is Numero Uno. Taking away or losing the assumption of anyone giving a shit, for today’s writer, is top priority. At first, once you begin to accept that nobody gives a shit, you will find yourself questioning just what the hell you were even doing it for. This is good, this is a good question. At the very least you have to come to terms with the fact that no one is going to give a shit and you still have to be ok with that. Still want to…

Jonah Andrist

Podcast: Western Thought. Writes literary fiction. His audiobook The Town of Books; first chapter. https://www.mixcloud.com/jondrist/town-of-books-chapter-1/

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